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Cafe inside the V&A

The first museum in the world to offer a restaurant, the V&A cafe is divided into three parts – the Gamble, Poynter and Morris rooms, which were built over the museum’s 10-year construction period – 1863 – 1873. The latter was designed by William Morris with rich patterned wallpaper so typical of his style. It is more intimate than the large atrium hall – the Gamble Room – which is extraordinary in design with soaring arches, stained glass windows, and embellished columns. The Poynter room – originally called the Grill Room because customers could watch the chef broil chops and steak here – has its original cast iron stove set into a wall of wood paneling and mosaic tile.

The three couldn’t be more different but signify a time of great evolution in the United Kingdom with transport becoming faster, major improvements occurring in living standards, and culture becoming more accessible.

The history of these rooms is incredible, with their decadent and well thought-out design, as well as the time they represent, made into the modern space that they are now.

Decor inside the V&A The V&A cafe piano v&a-cafe-9 The interior of the Victoria and Albert Cafe Kensiington The main room of the V&A cafe Working at the V&A cafe The interior of the Victoria and Albert Cafe Kensiington The interior of the Victoria and Albert Cafe Kensiington Stain glassed windows at the V&A cafe Amazing lighting at the V & A cafe

V&A Museum

Cromwell Rd
London
SW7 2RL

020 7942 2000